JL Williams and Catherine Street | In Conservation

about, artists, JL Williams

For our final week of In Detail, we have been talking to JL Williams and Catherine Street, discussing their inspirations, creative process and the different ways in which their projects  take place.


A lot of your work is performative. When did you first start to become interested in Spoken Word? Are there any Spoken Word artists who you particularly admire?

JL Williams: I once saw the poet Michael Longley read at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, and he was asked at the end of the event whether he thought poetry belonged on the page or on the tongue. He answered that he thought poetry was (pointing to his mouth) first oral, then (pointing to his ear) aural, and then for the page. This rang true to me.

In my experience, poetry comes as emotion, sound, observation, reflection, story, image. I hear the words and write the words that form in my head so I can remember them and share them with people who aren’t in the room with me. If people are in the room, then I am eager to share the work by reading out these written down words, or sometimes even singing them. I don’t separate the two (written/spoken) in the act of creation. I don’t think of some of my work as specifically for the page and some as specifically for performance, and I would not call myself a Performance Poet or a Spoken Word Artist. Performance Poetry and Spoken Word are diverse categories, and there are artists I admire and cultures associated with these forms that I enjoy very much. I respect these categories but in my own performance and curatorial work I strive to break down divisions between the written and spoken poetic word. I find it more rewarding and creative to think of how we share poetic work in a fluid and responsive way… what does the poem desire? What does the moment desire?

ARTIST ROOMS

Ian Hamilton Finlay

 

During 2013, Ian Hamilton Finlay was exhibited as a part of the touring exhibition series, ARTIST ROOMS, produced in collaboration with Tate and institutions throughout the UK. ARTIST ROOMS, was established in 2008, through the donation of over 1,600 pieces of contemporary art by the collector Antony D’offay. It aims to provide the public with regular and accessible opportunities to view work from important contemporary artists.

Finlay was exhibited at: The Park Gallery, Falkirk

Nature over again after Poussin 1979–1980

24 August 16 November 2013
artist_rooms_ian_hamilton_finlay_-_falkirk
Image: Tate Modern

The Sound Of

artists, Katie Paterson

The use, application and exploration of sound has played an important, if somewhat under acknowledged role throughout both modernism and postmodernism.

Beginning with the infamous composition of John Cage’s ‘4″33‘ (1982), silence was used as artistic medium as an invitation to listen to all sounds both natural and man-made. Cage’s explorations into the function of sonic interventions within art set about a generation of sound artists; Annea Lockwood, Bill Fontana, La Monte Young, MaryAnne Amacher, Bernhard Leitner, Max Neuhaus. These artists began a long and far reaching journey into the limits of sound when used within sculpture, exhibitions and public space.

Bill Fontana was a pioneer of the term ‘sound sculpture’. A process of using naturally occurring sounds to pose interventions into public space.

Image courtesy of Tate

His Harmonic Bridge (2006), was an installation installed at the Millennium Bridge, London which used vibration sensors to reveal the innumerable hidden sounds of the bridge.

In a different fashion, Bernhard Leitner, used the gallery, rather than the public space to create sounds installations or ‘sound-space-objects’. His work is often refereed to as sound architecture, using sound to create spatial models of geometry.

Katie Paterson is one such artist who uses sound to create and sculpt sonic interventions within the exhibition space and beyond.

A number of her previous projects have explored the use and appropriation of sound when taken from its natural context….

 

Every Night About This Time

A series of occurrences, simultaneous happenings/events/scores

 

Langjökull, Snæfellsjökull, Solheimajökull

Three glacier ice records, played until they melt.

 

Earth–Moon–Earth (4’33”)

Four minutes and thirty three seconds of silence reflected from the moon to earth.

 

Read more details of Paterson’s works on her artist website:

http://www.katiepaterson.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuymans + Sasnal

about, artists, Luc Tuymans

A lot has been written about the relationship between the Polish artist Wilhelm Sasnal and Luc Tuymans. Both artists (each represented by Saatchi Gallery) incorporate found, banal and everyday images of mass media into a wider socio-political narrative worked into their paintings, prints and drawings. Influences from art history and 20th century propaganda are used to heavily influence their works, presenting visually fragmented appropriations of historical events and persons; the stronghold of the Soviet Union, Alexander Rodchenko, suicide bombing, the holocaust and British celebrity culture.

1970s Feminist Body Art

artists, Jessica Harrison

When thinking along the lines of altering the female body for artistic subversion, a whole range of feminist artistic practices come to mind, particularly those of female artists creating body art during the height of second wave feminism.

Ana Mendieta, Untitled (Glass on Body Imprints–face), 1972

© Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection, Courtesy Galerie LeLong

Literature

about, artists, Jessica Harrison

Jessica Harrison’s work has been widely accepted as iconic and subversive, aggressive and gory, beautiful and transcendent. Her work has inspired a great amount of press over the years, read a selection below:

The Skinny- Jessica Harrison Feminist Figurines 

“The thing about these figurines is they’re these beautiful ladies with their impossibly fair skin and their worry free expressions and their buoyant skirts, but they’re hollow and empty; I wanted to turn them inside out and expose that hollowness,”

http://www.theskinny.co.uk/art/interviews/jessica-harrison-feminist-figurines

Daniel Hughes | Studio

artists, Daniel Hughes

Before its physical materialisation, Daniel Hughes’ work begins on screen. Layering, collaging and sketching on Photoshop, Hughes uses images and content gathered from his surrounding environment.

His current project, a series called ‘Territorial Pissings’, plays with the displacement of gestural marks the artist has captured on his phone around London. From graffiti tags to paint spilt on roads, he has begun to create abstract paintings that layer and confuse these ‘silent’ gestures.

Animals in Art

artists, Isobel Turley

The prolonged human fascination held with animals is constantly seen within the art world. Alongside Turley’s work, we look at just a few other examples of artists intrigued by our interaction and relationship with animals:

Phillip Warnell

An artist-filmmaker and academic, Warnell’s practice is focused on exploring animality, cinemality and criminality using film, text and philosophy.  His film Ming of Harlem: Twenty one Storeys in the Air explores the story of a five hundred pound tiger living in a New York apartment with a man, seven-foot alligator and house cat.