JL Williams and Catherine Street | In Conservation

about, artists, JL Williams

For our final week of In Detail, we have been talking to JL Williams and Catherine Street, discussing their inspirations, creative process and the different ways in which their projects  take place.


A lot of your work is performative. When did you first start to become interested in Spoken Word? Are there any Spoken Word artists who you particularly admire?

JL Williams: I once saw the poet Michael Longley read at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, and he was asked at the end of the event whether he thought poetry belonged on the page or on the tongue. He answered that he thought poetry was (pointing to his mouth) first oral, then (pointing to his ear) aural, and then for the page. This rang true to me.

In my experience, poetry comes as emotion, sound, observation, reflection, story, image. I hear the words and write the words that form in my head so I can remember them and share them with people who aren’t in the room with me. If people are in the room, then I am eager to share the work by reading out these written down words, or sometimes even singing them. I don’t separate the two (written/spoken) in the act of creation. I don’t think of some of my work as specifically for the page and some as specifically for performance, and I would not call myself a Performance Poet or a Spoken Word Artist. Performance Poetry and Spoken Word are diverse categories, and there are artists I admire and cultures associated with these forms that I enjoy very much. I respect these categories but in my own performance and curatorial work I strive to break down divisions between the written and spoken poetic word. I find it more rewarding and creative to think of how we share poetic work in a fluid and responsive way… what does the poem desire? What does the moment desire?

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Introduction | Ian Hamilton Finlay

about, artists, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Introduction

The late Ian Hamilton Finlay (1925 -2006) forged a career as one of Scotland’s most successful and distinguished artists. Finlay was born and raised in both Glasgow and the Orkney Islands, but later moved to practice in Edinburgh where he became a founding member of the Concrete Poetry movement.

Katie Paterson | Studio

artists, Katie Paterson

The concepts behind Katie Paterson’s practice take her all around the globe, transforming her studio from Berlin to nomadic at times.

For her work Future Library, she made her way up north to Oslo where a forest has been planted ready to supply the paper for 100 new texts to be printed in 100 years time, in 2114.

A secretive artwork with an uncertain future audience who will receive what could be a beautiful gift from the past.

Katie Paterson_Future Library_PRESS

Totality

artists, Katie Paterson

A mirrorball of over 10,000 solar eclipses rotates to create a sparkling progression of the eclipse across a room.

The images make up nearly every solar eclipse documented by humankind, from total through to quarter and half eclipses.

 

A beautiful spectacle of the sun eclipsing the moon.

 

 

Katie Paterson

Totality, 2016

A mirrorball of every solar eclipse (mixed media)

Edition of 3

83 x 83 x 83 cm

Installation view, The Lowry, Manchester, 2016

 

 

 

Photograph: Ben Blackall

Image courtesy the Artist/ The Lowry, Manchester/ Ingleby, Edinburgh

The Sound Of

artists, Katie Paterson

The use, application and exploration of sound has played an important, if somewhat under acknowledged role throughout both modernism and postmodernism.

Beginning with the infamous composition of John Cage’s ‘4″33‘ (1982), silence was used as artistic medium as an invitation to listen to all sounds both natural and man-made. Cage’s explorations into the function of sonic interventions within art set about a generation of sound artists; Annea Lockwood, Bill Fontana, La Monte Young, MaryAnne Amacher, Bernhard Leitner, Max Neuhaus. These artists began a long and far reaching journey into the limits of sound when used within sculpture, exhibitions and public space.

Bill Fontana was a pioneer of the term ‘sound sculpture’. A process of using naturally occurring sounds to pose interventions into public space.

Image courtesy of Tate

His Harmonic Bridge (2006), was an installation installed at the Millennium Bridge, London which used vibration sensors to reveal the innumerable hidden sounds of the bridge.

In a different fashion, Bernhard Leitner, used the gallery, rather than the public space to create sounds installations or ‘sound-space-objects’. His work is often refereed to as sound architecture, using sound to create spatial models of geometry.

Katie Paterson is one such artist who uses sound to create and sculpt sonic interventions within the exhibition space and beyond.

A number of her previous projects have explored the use and appropriation of sound when taken from its natural context….

 

Every Night About This Time

A series of occurrences, simultaneous happenings/events/scores

 

Langjökull, Snæfellsjökull, Solheimajökull

Three glacier ice records, played until they melt.

 

Earth–Moon–Earth (4’33”)

Four minutes and thirty three seconds of silence reflected from the moon to earth.

 

Read more details of Paterson’s works on her artist website:

http://www.katiepaterson.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katie Paterson | Introduction

about, artists, Introduction, Katie Paterson

Katie Paterson is a Glasgow-born visual artist who graduated from ECA in 2004, before completing her MFA at the Slade School of Art three years later.

Now living and working in Berlin, Paterson’s practice is concerned with ecology, technology and astronomy. Throughout her career she has presented a body of work which has drifted from the physical landscapes of Earth, to the incalculability of the universe, often investigating the mysteries of our galaxy through a framework of scientific and conceptual projects. She uses the tangible object to capture the intangible nature of the cosmos and beyond.

Tuymans + Sasnal

about, artists, Luc Tuymans

A lot has been written about the relationship between the Polish artist Wilhelm Sasnal and Luc Tuymans. Both artists (each represented by Saatchi Gallery) incorporate found, banal and everyday images of mass media into a wider socio-political narrative worked into their paintings, prints and drawings. Influences from art history and 20th century propaganda are used to heavily influence their works, presenting visually fragmented appropriations of historical events and persons; the stronghold of the Soviet Union, Alexander Rodchenko, suicide bombing, the holocaust and British celebrity culture.

Tuymans + Raeburn

artists, Luc Tuymans

From a young age, Tuymans has always admired the portraits of Scottish painter Henry Raeburn (1756 – 1832).

Working with Talbot Rice Gallery, University of Edinburgh, Tuymans was given the opportunity to choose a selection of paintings by the Scottish enlightenment painter to exhibit his work with in the Gallery space.